LONDON B&W

What a lot of fun to wander around the city of London with a little, inconspicuous camera…

© John Lovett 2018

 

© John Lovett 2018

 

Big Red Bus

© John Lovett 2018

 

© John Lovett 2018

 

 

 

© John Lovett 2018

 

© John Lovett 2018

 

© John Lovett 2018

 

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

 

Brompton Cemetery

© John Lovett 2018

 

Victoria and Albert Museum

© John Lovett 2018

 

Royal Albert Hall

© John Lovett 2018

 

The Royal Box RAH

© John Lovett 2018

 

Lunch at the Hop Pole

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

 

 

Earl’s Court Station

© John Lovett 2018

 

Tate Modern

© John Lovett 2018

 

Small patch of sun – St. Paul’s Cathedral

© John Lovett 2018

 

Boats on the Thames

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

MONTANA WEST

Following our workshop in Calgary, we drove back into the USA to cross the Rockies in Montana. Driving through Glacier National Park on Going to the Sun Road is one of the most spectacular drives. We plodded our way slowly, stopping every chance we got to take in the view and do some walks.

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

The weather closed in as we reached the top of the mountains, but the rain, snow and fog sure added a wildness to the spectacular atmosphere of the mountains.

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

Driving out of Glacier National Park, we headed west across Montana. The country flattens out and is dotted with small ranches.

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

Mobile road block occupying 100% of the bitumen.

© John Lovett 2018

We met this guy and his wife, who live in the woods at the foot of Glacier Nat. Park. Their dog chases away bears.

© John Lovett 2018

Kootenai Falls where The Revenant was shot. © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

Crossing Idaho and into Washington the landscape turns to rolling hills of wheat and canola farms.

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

We reached an interesting little town called Hunters in Washington State. It looked like nothing much had changed there since the 1950’s. From here we turned North, drove back up into Canada and the Okanagan Valley for another workshop in the town of Kelowna.

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BEAR RIVER POW-WOW

Dillmans Bay Resort, the venue for our Wisconsin workshop, is situated in the Indian reservation of Lac du Flambeau. We were lucky enough to be there when the annual Bear River Pow-Wow was being held. Lots of drums, chanting and dancing as the sun went down made for some great photos and an interesting evening.

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018  © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

HWY 80 to NEW MEXICO

After leaving Bisbee, our plan was to head east across the bottom of Arizona to the Chiricahua Mountains. This road took us through the small settlement of Apache near where Geronimo surrendered to the Us Army in 1886, ending the Indian wars.

© John Lovett 2018

Crossing into New Mexico, we stopped at a roadhouse in the little town of Rodeo. It was an interesting place with great food and an entertaining passage of local ranchers stopping in for coffee and gossip.

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

Further down the road a Museum had a great collection of local desert snakes – all safely behind glass. We hadn’t managed to see a rattle snake in all our wandering around, so this was a good opportunity to get a photograph.

© John Lovett 2018

Crossing back into Arizona, we headed up to Portal in the Chiricahua Mountains. The mountains were spectacular with birds and wildlife everywhere.

© John Lovett 2018  © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

 

 

© John Lovett 2018

Hummingbirds were a lot of fun to photograph, being so small and moving so fast. Even at 2000th of a second their wings are blurred.
© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

From Portal we climbed the mountains up to around 10,000 feet, passing the huge Morenci copper mine.

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018

Old Indian cliff dwellings outside Camp Verde

© John Lovett 2018

LOWELL and BISBEE

Bisbee is a copper mining town that has, some how,  flourished since the mine closed. The steep landscape and opulent architecture, from the boom days, make the town uniquely attractive. Lots of interesting pubs, bars and restaurants, and an atmosphere of 1960’s counter culture, have given Bisbee a whole new life.

Just outside of Bisbee is, what’s left of, the town of Lowell. In the 1950’s the mine pit was expanded to extract more copper and most of the town was consumed in the expansion. What is left (Eire Street) appears to have been frozen in time. Crumbling buildings, closed businesses, old cars, weeds and debris. A fantastic and confusing place.

© John Lovett 2018
Reflections in a junk shop window

© John Lovett 2018
Bisbee graffiti wall

© John Lovett 2018
Chainsaw on a roof

© John Lovett 2018
Rustys Snacks

© John Lovett 2018
Main Street Bisbee

© John Lovett 2018
Captivating display of ancient dentistry.

© John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018
Bisbee mine  head

© John Lovett 2018
Mine Site

© John Lovett 2018
Shell servo, Lowell

© John Lovett 2018
Cadillac from space

© John Lovett 2018
Outside Lowell Gym.

© John Lovett 2018
Welcome

© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

© John Lovett 2018© John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018 © John Lovett 2018

CAMBODIA

 

After a great workshop in Vietnam, Dianne and I flew over to Siem Reap in Cambodia to see the Angkor temples and waterside villages on  Tonle Sap lake. The Cambodian people are happy and friendly. The country is 97% Buddhist and many of the children, from poorer families, go into the monasteries to take pressure off the families. 

We met Pau, who entered a monastery at eight years of age and is now in his early twenties. He enjoys the discipline of the monastery. He speaks good English and is studying education. His goal is to open a village school to improve the chances for young people to work and study.

© John Lovett 2017
Monastery accommodation is austere and simple.

© John Lovett 2017
Pau, happy with his life as a Monk.

© John Lovett 2017
Detail of intricate stone carving from Angkor Wat

© John Lovett 2017

Angkor Wat Temple

© John Lovett 2017

Stone gable carving Angkor Wat

© John Lovett 2017

Ta Phrom Temple – slowly being eaten by the jungle.

© John Lovett 2017

 

Thom Bayon Temple features large carved stone heads of Buddha and beautiful, intricate relief carvings of daily life back in the 11th and 12th centuries.

© John Lovett 2017

© John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017  © John Lovett 2017

Temple monkey overcome with boredom

© John Lovett 2017

Temple monkey overcome with confusion

© John Lovett 2017

Temple monkey overcome with enlightenment.

 

© John Lovett 2017

Siem Reap petrol tanker – powered by a mechanical plough.

© John Lovett 2017

Fire pot vendor powered by a small motor scooter

© John Lovett 2017

Mattress vendor- powered by a small motorbike

 

© John Lovett 2017

With the luxury of a small truck, there is nothing you can’t carry.

 

From Siem Reap we travelled by tuk tuk down to Kampong Phluk – a village of stilt houses, some colorful, some old and thatched, built in the Tonle Sap Lake. It’s a fascinating village – life is lived entirely on the water. Kids grow up in boats and soon become skilled fishermen.

© John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017© John Lovett 2017© John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017   © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017 © John Lovett 2017

MT MOFFAT & BLACKALL 2017

The Blackall workshops are always a lot of fun. We get to meet people from surrounding sheep and cattle stations and local Blackall residents in the first workshop then folks fly in or drive from all over the place for the second workshop.

This year we left a couple of weeks early so we could visit Mt Moffat on the way west. Mt Moffat is part of the Carnarvon National Park. It connects to the head of Carnarvon Creek at the western end of Carnarvon Gorge and extends south.

Similar eroded, pale sandstone to Carnarvon Gorge is found throughout the Mt Moffat section. Access is by 4WD – there are some deeply rutted tracks, sandy sections and steep climbs up onto the plateau.

 

There are interesting sandstone formations and many escarpments and rock faces with aboriginal art work.

 

 

Confusing sign if you don’t read English!

 

We camped at Dargonelly Rock Hole. It was the only water source in the area, so animal and birdlife was pretty spectacular particularly early morning and late afternoon.

 

On top of the plateau the view stretched out in all directions. The plateau is over 1200 meters above sea level – the highest plateau in Queensland. We drove up to the head of Carnarvon Creek, where the track winds through a forest of giant Mahogany trees.

 

Small slab hut on the road into Mt. Moffat

 

We were lucky enough to arrive in Blackall the night six musicians, all from different countries, were performing at the Living Arts Center where we were staying. It was amazing how well such a diverse group of musicians could all blend perfectly into music from any of the six countries. It was great to meet these musicians and hear their stories.

 

 

Old River Gum late afternoon – Tambo

 

We had a couple of days between the two Blackall workshops, so drove out to Yaraka – the last town on the railway line before it closed down in the 1990’s. Below is the small settlement of Emmet along the same defunct railway line.

 

Lost Chev – Yaraka

 

Sunset on Mt Slowcombe near Yaraka

 

I love visiting the Blackall wool scour. It closed down years ago but has been kept in running condition as a tourist attraction. It looks like something from a horror movie. Everything is belt driven, powered by a steam engine. Over a kilometre of leather belts keep everything moving. With all this mechanical movement there is barely a sound – it is all so well built and maintained.

 

Heading home we passed the Roma sale yards where one of the weekly cattle sales were in progress. It’s an amazing event. Road trains arrive from near and far, cattle are unloaded, auctions take place then cattle are re loaded and delivered to the successful bidders. The auctioneers speak their own language at a speed only understandable by those in colored shirts and big hats. It really is a spectacle.